Not Getting an Interview? Your Resume May be to Blame.

In my current role I have seen countless participants applying for jobs they had both the skills and experience for, but who were continuously missing out on an interview. Not only was this incredibly frustrating for them, it was also a blow to their confidence. Receptionists, project managers, personal care workers, chefs and engineers alike, they were all incredibly well qualified for the roles they were applying for. They also had one other thing in common – their resume was letting them down.

Problem #1 – Their resume was out-of-date

A resume is not a static document, it should always be evolving. Not only does the information within it need to be continuously updated, the overall structure of the document needs to move with the times. For example, whilst it was all the rage at one point to include a cover page with “RESUME OF…” emblazoned across it in 72 point font, in this day and age all that will do is make an employer roll their eyes and skip straight past your application. This is definitely not the kind of first impression you want to be making!

You also should make sure you resume is visually modern. Employers can and will make an initial judgement of your application based on how it looks, all without reading a single piece of text. Clean, clear sections with lots of white space are the order of the day whilst graphics, bright colours and borders should be banished immediately.

Problem #2 – Their resume was not properly targeted

One of the biggest mistakes people can make when applying for jobs is not correctly targeting their resume to the position they are applying for. Including irrelevant information, such as incomplete qualifications from a different industry, makes it harder for employers to quickly assess how suitable you are for the role. Make their job easier by ensuring all the information included is presented in a way that highlights just how great a fit for the role you are.

Speaking of how your information is presented, don’t underestimate the importance of how you order that information. There is no hard and fast rule that your employment history must come first. Whichever section is most relevant to the position should be listed first. For example, if you have previously worked in retail and are applying for a role in Aged Care, in which you have just completed training, then the Training section (and your relevant qualification) should be listed before your Work History.

Problem #3 – Their resume didn’t provide context

Whilst employers want to know what you have done in previous roles, it is not enough to simply list your tasks. What you really need to do is highlight the skills you demonstrated as part of that duty. So, for example, rather than stating “Completed maintenance logs” you should say something like “Accurately completed electronic maintenance logs and other related documentation for reporting purposes”. This shows that you can accurately enter data, have attention to detail, have reasonable IT skills and are experienced with reporting.

Problem #4 – Their experience was not quantified

Employers love figures when reviewing applications, it helps give them a clear idea of exactly what level of experience someone has had. For example, if an applicant simply states “Increased traffic to organisation website” the employer would immediately ask “by how much?” Was it 1%, 2%? That’s not very impressive. Over what time period? 6 months? A year? Without these details the statement means nothing.

A far better way of stating the same thing is to say “Increased traffic to organisation website by 15% over a 2 month period”. This takes the guess work out and shows the employer exactly what you have achieved.

If you have been applying for countless jobs and not getting a single call back, try these tips – I guarantee your phone will soon be ringing off the hook!

By Christina Matthews. 

If you need help updating your resume, book in for one of the Skills & Jobs Centre resume workshops in Geelong or Werribee.

Careers in the Health Sector: Insights from Epworth & Barwon Health

As many of you would be aware, the health care and social assistance industry is Australia’s biggest employer.  We were honoured to hold the Health Sector Insight Employer Panel in March. The panel members presented an overview of their organisation and an insight into their sector as well as an outline of their recruitment process and types of opportunities available.

The panel consisted of:

  • Mick Fuller (Senior HR Manger)  Epworth Healthcare
  • Christine Shaw (Advisor – Talent Acquisition & Services)  Barwon Health

Epworth Healthcare

Background

Epworth has been around for 100 years and is the largest private not for profit hospital. Epworth moved to Geelong last year, next to Deakin University in Waurn Ponds. Had 400 employees in July when they opened and now has 550 employees. The Epworth Group employs over 6000 people with the majority of staff employed in Richmond.

Mick’s personal experience includes a transition into the Health sector from a retail and manufacturing background. He believes you need to be passionate about the organisation you work for and so was attracted to the Epworth name and the professional but diverse environment they offer. He has worked at the Epworth for the past 18 months.

The Epworth Workforce

  1. Nursing Staff
    • Heavy reliance on Nursing Staff
    • Employs Registered Nurses & Enrolled Nurses, but will only employ endorsed Enrolled Nurses
  2. Food Services
    • Primarily employs people with a hospitality background.
    • Food Service Model which involves personalised screens for patients to order meals at any time of the day, following a hotel model. Patients have a choice of when they receive the meal and what the meal is. The menu is catered to your personal needs, including medical and dietary requirements.
    • Is less to do with health and more to do with customer service.
    • Attracting and employing people from 5-star backgrounds including the Head Chef who came from the Park Hyatt.
  3. Sterilisation
    • Involves looking after the equipment and getting it ready for surgery.
    • Certified role, you need to have completed a Cert III or Cert IV in Sterilisation.
    • Well-paid
    • Good work
    • Stable employment
    • Professional roles
  4. Theatre Technicians
    • Involved in bringing in the equipment and setting up the theatre.
    • Certified role – need a Certificate to be employed.
    • Certificate level courses will allow you to be employed, so you can get up and running fairly quickly.
    • Good pay.
    • Shortage of theatre technicians in Geelong.
  5. Administrative Positions
    • Includes Reception, Personal Assistants and Ward Clerks.
    • For advertised positions, 75+ applications are received.
    • Lots of competition for a small number of roles.
  6. Traineeships
    • Not currently offered as they are not a mature organisation.
    • Will put structures in place first, then look at offering traineeship opportunities.

What Epworth looks for in an employee

  1. Technical Skills
    • Skills/Qualifications that are required for each role
    • Are tightly bunched, as lots of people will have the same qualifications.
  2. Non-Technical Skills
    • Human part
    • Customer service skills
    • Values – Epworth takes their values very seriously
      • Respect
      • Excellence
      • Community
      • Compassion
      • Integrity
      • Accountability
    • This is where people can differentiate themselves
    • Look on the website and find out about the values. If you are invited for an interview, think about how your values align with theirs.

Epworth’s Recruitment Process

  1. 2 phase interview process
    • Phone Interview – 15-20 min phone interview with hiring manager
    • Face-to-face Interview – 45min – 1hr interview with hiring manager and a representative from HR.
    • Come prepared and know about the environment. Make sure to check the website. This shows motivation, respect and initiative.
  2. Psychometric Test 
    • No right or wrong answer, but used to measure your values and behaviours.

Advertising of roles

  • 95% of roles are advertised, as they are looking for the best person for the role.
  • Advertised on:
    1. Epworth website – www.epworthcareers.org.au
    2. Seek
    3. LinkedIn
    4. Specialty Job Boards
  • Can complete an Expression of Interest on the website, indicating the roles you are interested in, and you will receive an email to notify when those types of roles are advertised.

How to apply for a job at Epworth

  1. Submit a Resume, Cover Letter and response to Key Selection Criteria.
  2. Resume
    • 4-5 page maximum
    • Don’t be distracting
    • Don’t use colour or different font throughout the document
    • Keep professional
    • Use a single font in 11 or 12pt
    • No photos
  3. Cover letter
    • Tailor your cover letter – very important!
    • Make sure to change the name of the company – this shows care and attention to detail
    • Brief and to the point
    • 1 page
    • Show what you can bring to Epworth
  4. Key Selection Criteria
    • Flexible with regards to addressing Key Selection Criteria and won’t always ask for this to be completed separately
    • Look at the Position Description and address how your skills match and how your motivation fits
    • Show that you are committed to professional development
    • Show your connection to the community. This can be through involvement with sporting clubs or coaching your kid’s soccer team. This tells about you as a person.
    • Lots of people have the technical skills, but less meet the criteria of fit, culture and personality.

Barwon Health

Background

Barwon Health is the largest employer in Geelong, employing over 7000 people. They look after people from birth through to death and have 21 sites, including the hospital, Grace McKellar Centre, a number of Aged Care facilities and look after patients all the way to the South Australian border.

Health is the fastest growing industry in Geelong and in 2016 Barwon Health advertised over 1500 roles. It is an exciting industry with new innovations and a secure future.

Christine is new to the Health Care sector and shared that it’s a great environment to work in. The people are lovely and are there to help people. Others share the same values as you.

The Barwon Health Workforce

  1. Community Sector
    • More work will involve going to the patient’s in their homes, rather than the patients coming in
  2. Aged Care
    • Increasing % of people in the older age bracket means they are desperate to get great people working in this sector
  3. Theatre Technicians
    • All start off as casuals.
    • Need a Certificate III first.
    • Will see medical procedures, so have to be ok with that.
    • Have to be able to look after yourself and deal with situations.
    • Training – might need to go to Melbourne for training, but will be rewarded for this.
    • Look at job ads and speak to the Manager listed to ask questions about which courses they would suggest.
    • Good pay & a good job.
  4. Casual Administration Pool
    • Approximately 50 casuals who work across the sites.
  5. Nursing Casual Pool
  6. Volunteers
    • Seen as internal candidates, so can apply for internal roles.
    • Allows you to connect with different departments.
  7. Traineeships
    • Offered 24 last year.
    • Mainly offered through Northern Futures, to help more disadvantaged members of the community.
    • Offered in various areas, including Admin & Stores.

What Barwon Health looks for in an employee

  • All about the attitude.
  • Flexible
  • Adaptable
  • Available 7 days a week, 24 hours a day (If you’re looking for a Mon-Fri 9-5 position, this is probably not the area for you).
  • People who are excited about working in health care and are passionate about putting the patient first.
  • Looking for people who are really passionate.
  • Not great pay, but the reward is that you are there to help the community.
  • Barwon Health is value driven and they live their values, including in performance discussions every 12 months.
  • Recruit based on values.

Barwon Health’s Recruitment Process

  1. Decentralised process – each manager runs their own interviews.
  2. Phone Interview First
  3. Interview
    • Talk about your passions and how you align with Barwon Health’s values.
    • Make sure you are prepared.
    • Research:
      1. Website
      2. Position Description
      3. Values
      4. If you know someone who works at Barwon Health, ask them!
      5. Call the Manager (if name on ad) and ask questions to start to build your relationship.
    • They understand that it’s scary and you’ll probably be nervous.
    • Take notes in.
    • Will be asked behavioural questions so have examples ready.
  4. Assessment Centres are popular (especially for CPO roles).
    • Up to 20 people.
    • Group activity, followed by an Individual Interview.
    • Remember, you are being monitored from the time you walk in, to the time you leave.
    • Assessing your true self – it’s ok if you are loud or quiet.
    • Looking at who you are.
    • How do you work in a team? Do you listen? Can you contribute?
    • Don’t take over, but don’t sit back. Just be yourself.
    • Contribute to the conversation.
    • If you are a leader, be a leader. Leaders are needed too! Just don’t be aggressive.
  5. Volunteering

Advertising of roles

  • Lots of internal advertising, due to the Enterprise Bargaining Agreement and the fact that Barwon Health encourages people to progress.
  • Casual Positions – lots of casual positions come up. Don’t be scared to apply as there are opportunities to pick up more shifts once you are in the door.
  • Theatre Technicians – Will be advertising positions soon.
  • Can register your interest online and will be sent job alerts.
  • Advertised on the website – http://www.barwonhealth.org.au/careers.

How to apply for a job at Barwon Health

Before you apply, think about:

  • Can you be available 24/7?
  • Are you passionate and excited about this industry?
  1. Need to upload a Cover Letter, Resume and then answer the Key Selection Criteria.
  2. Resume
    • Only include what’s relevant
    • Don’t go too over the top
    • Include your key skills
    • Have a profile at the top of your CV – this is very important as it gives the employer a snapshot of you
    • Will spend on average 10 seconds looking at your resume, so the top section is the most important
    • Clear & Concise
    • Easy to read
    • Easy layout
    • Managers read them, so make it easy to read
    • Include volunteering opportunities as this shows your connection to the community.
  3. Cover Letter
    • Talk about your passions.
  4. Key Selection Criteria
    • Part of the process.
    • Some are Y/N questions.
    • Need to address the criteria, but shouldn’t have to spend days on it.

Helpful Tips

  • There are lots of casual opportunities, so make the most of these. We are very lucky in Geelong that we have a great hospital network.
  • Casual gets your foot in the door and there are lots of opportunities. People are working across multiple organisations and hospitals in Geelong.
  • You are able to put in your availability on a weekly or monthly basis and it will match to what manager’s need.
  • It’s ok if you aren’t available all the time or if you can’t do a shift, as there is a big pool of casuals.
  • However, be responsive. If you are knocking back lots of shifts, it will seem like you are not available.
  • People are moving around the organisation more, opening up more opportunities.

If you are interested in a career in the health sector, book your FREE one-on-one appointment with any of the Skills and Jobs Centre advisors.

Worried about gaps in your work history?

There are many reasons why someone could have gaps in their work history. They may have chosen to take time out of the workforce to raise their children. They may have needed a break to care for an ill relative or to recover from an illness themselves. They may have travelled. Or they may have been retrenched and struggled to find replacement work. These are all valid reasons, though it can be hard to know how to deal with them on your resume. The question is how to acknowledge them whilst still showing the employer you have the skills and experience to meet their needs.

Explain

Whilst the idea of just ignoring the gaps and hoping the employer won’t notice is attractive, it’s also fraught with danger. Employers will always notice them, I can guarantee it. If you don’t provide an explanation they will make assumptions about why you weren’t working during this time – usually negative ones. Luckily the majority of employers are understanding, but you do need to give them an explanation.

You don’t have to go into too much detail about what happened, a sentence or two in your cover letter or in the summary section of a resume will do. If you can alert the employer that you have had gaps in your work history, and provide a legitimate reason why, then you increase the chances of the employer understanding your situation and assessing your application fairly. 

Rearrange

Once you have explained the reason behind the gap you need to adjust the order in which the information is presented in your resume. If you haven’t been doing any casual work, whatever you are currently doing/have been doing most recently should be listed first – this may be study (including short courses), a volunteer role or anything else that is relevant to the role you are applying for (e.g. a cookery blog you have been writing if you are applying for hospitality roles).

Employers understand that gaps can happen, but they do like to see that you have been doing something whilst you have not been working.

Emphasise

The easiest way to clearly show an employer your suitability is to focus on your skills. Employers care about what you can do, they don’t care whether those skills were developed in paid employment or not. If you have most recently been volunteering treat it like a job on your resume by highlighting the skills you utilised and any achievements you had. It is the same for any training you have done. By emphasising how your skills match the employer’s needs you can make them so keen on you, they may even forget the employment gaps exist!

Written by our resume queen, Christina. If you have questions about what to include in your resume, book in to our upcoming resume workshop.

Picture credit: walkerud97CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0)

Sample answers to common interview questions.

Although you can’t predict exactly what questions will be asked – you can think about possible questions and prepare BRIEF responses beforehand.

Some questions will be behavioural (on the assumption that past behaviour is a predictor of future behaviour). This requires examples of where, when or how you did something.

For these use the S.T.A.R. method to help keep your responses relevant.

star
S.T.A.R. = Situation, Task, Action & Response

 

Straightforward Questions

Tell us about yourself?

  • Be concise, relevant and interesting.
  • What has lead you to this interview:
    • A passion for . . . . . .
    • Studied &/or worked &/or volunteered with . . . . . .
    • Gained relevant employability skills by . . . .
    • Now keen to . . . . . . .
  • Focus on how and why you became interested in this area or role & show the skills you bring to this position – show that you are a good fit for the position.

A Poor Response: Too few details, not convincing or focusing on one aspect e.g. your childhood.

Why did you apply for this role?

  • Why you are keen to work in this particular role and for this particular organisation.
  • Employers want people who are connected to working for them and working within their team.
  • Focus on the key factors that make you a great fit for the role.
  • You need to match your skills to the skills the role requires e.g.
    • ‘I have always been interested in . . . . ., and valued my studies in . . . . . .
    • ‘I have also gained relevant employability skills such as . . . in my work at/with  . . . and gained further skills such as . . . in my work placement/volunteer role at . . . .’
  • Next: Link that information to what the organisation does and how that connects to the role.
  • Finally, focus on what it is about the organisation that drew you to apply and why you want to be a part of that.

A Poor Response: I need a job.

What do you know about the company?

  • Show you have done some research. This requires information that is found on their website and/or under the ‘About us’ button.
  • Perhaps you can focus on an aspect from their Mission Statement, Values or History e.g. The fact that they are in a new, cutting edge industry.
  • It may require further research about the organisations future plans, or even knowledge of their achievements or the awards they have received.
  • Your networking skills may connect you with a contact person who works or worked there, and may provide more information.
  • Be clear as to why this information or knowledge about the company appeals to you.

A Poor Response: Not much.

Why should we hire you?

  • This is a great opportunity to sell your skills & experiences.
  • You need to show that you are capable of doing the work and delivering the results that the company wants.
  • Show you can fit in with the team as well as the company culture.
  • Show you are the best fit by focusing on examples that demonstrate the required skills and abilities from your recent experiences.

A Poor Response: Little detail.

What are your greatest strengths?

  • Be genuine, accurate and relevant.
  • Show your true skills – not just what they want to hear. It may also include values.
  • Choose the strengths that are most suitable for this particular position and be specific.
  • Give an example of how you’ve demonstrated these traits in a professional setting.

A Poor Response: Everything!

Really Difficult Questions (Don’t be afraid!)

How would you deal with conflict?

  • Examples need to reflect an understanding that we are all different and have different perspectives and ideas. In team meetings you need to show that you embrace the diversity of views, listen to others, appreciate their perspective, contribute and let the group and/or leaders make the decisions.
  • Sometimes people become frustrated and may behave badly. Whether this is someone in the general public or within an organisation, any conflict requires you to remain calm, listen carefully and focus on resolving the issue, or seek assistance from someone who can resolve the issue.
  • For issues with team members it may be that this outburst is unusual and may indicate that someone is struggling with other issue. You may need to check they are OK and encourage them to seek assistance.
  • In any example steer clear of being negative in your example and never criticise others.

A Poor Response: Criticising management

Why did you leave your last job?

  • This is such a tricky question.
  • Turn the focus to why you are seeking a new position.
  • You do not have to divulge personal details or mention everything you thought about your last position.
  • In the end you are seeking a new opportunity, a change, to gain more or broader skills, to work in a different or related area or to take up a promotion. You may have been training in a new area whilst working and now want to use the training and your employability skills in a new or different position. Or you may be passionate about what this company does and want to be a part of that.
  • Even if you felt unappreciated, that the culture has changed or you were no longer happy, now is not the time or place to discuss these issues.
  • It is better to focus on positive aspects such as seeking new challenges, extending skills & experiences, new qualifications and wanting to work in that area, limited opportunities where I was, retrenched, the business closed or had time off to have a family.

What are your weaknesses?

  • Another really terrifying question.
  • It is best to focus on something you have since addressed, that you used to do but have worked on so that it is not a problem now.
  • Focus on something you have improved e.g. skills such as planning and organisation, communication or working in multidisciplinary teams, or perhaps your personal life such as work/life balance or introducing more exercise in your daily routine.

Written by our resident interview champion, Robyn. If you need help with preparing for an interview, come along to Robyn’s interview workshop or make an appointment for interview coaching with any of the Skills and Jobs Centre advisors.

Picture credit: Geralt

Getting your foot in the door..

How do I get my foot in the door you may ask?

Many of us have secured a job by connecting with a prospective employer – maybe it was tapping into an existing network, maybe it was cold calling, maybe it was through volunteering or social media…

It all takes courage, a plan and persistence!

Tapping into your network

Don’t be afraid. Remember, you’re asking for advice to assist you in job searching, not asking for a job, and most people will be flattered and supportive.  Your network can assist you in your job search by providing some really important information regarding current industry knowledge, skills and qualities the employer values, as well as referrals and linking you to possible upcoming opportunities.

You could start by reaching out to those people who know and respect you, including past colleagues or employers, family and acquaintances, as well as using any online professional networks you may have to make sure they know that you are genuinely looking for a new job or even a new career.

This is where planning and researching becomes oh, so important.

  1. Create a list of past employers, suppliers, personal and professional contacts.
  2. Ensure your online profile (if you have one) is up to date and reflects that you are in the market for a new career opportunity.
  3. Be prepared – modify and showcase your resume to reflect your skills and experience to match the organisations and industries you are interested in.

Cold Calling

Cold calling is another way for you to contact employers directly.  This may be over the phone, by email or in person.  You need to research a company or organisation thoroughly to ensure you are identifying employers relevant for your career needs and aspirations, and ensuring your skills and experiences are a match. Again, if you are planning to send or provide a cover letter and your resume, it should be professional and tailored each time you contact an employer.

And finally, I would recommend taking the time to develop a script for yourself to ensure you are confident when you introduce yourself. Prepare and practice, then follow up.  Here are five golden tips for cold calling.

Written by Lucinda, our new Networking Superstar. If you need help with getting your foot in the door, make a time to talk to Lucinda or any of the Skills and Jobs Centre advisors. 

I can’t get a job because I have no experience..

Transferable Skills – You might have more experience than you think!

Are you always feeling somewhat under qualified, or can’t find any evidence of how your skills or experience may fit the job criteria?

Do you think you have little capacity to fit the bill every time you search SEEK online?

Well it’s time to change your thinking.

If you start to dig below the surface of how you perceive your personal and professional experience, you may find a few hidden gems just waiting to shine.

Whether you haven’t worked for a very long time, you haven’t worked at all, or you have been trying to change careers for a long time, there are always some valuable skills and qualities you have earned from your life experience. These skills sets and qualities are called Transferable Skills and they can be fundamental to finding work.

So what interests an employer besides my current work history?   

Employers can be persuaded by a variety of things other than just an obvious skills match. Admittedly getting past the strict parameters set by recruitment companies and HR Teams can be nigh on impossible, however some workplaces may want more than just a list of responsibilities from your latest job profile.

This is where your TRANSFERABLE SKILLS may come in handy.

Transferable skills, sometimes known as Employability Skills, are the skills we acquire as a result of life experiences, employment and in many cases roles or responsibilities we have undertaken outside of the work environment.  This could be parenting, coaching, volunteering, managing, mentoring or assisting in community events, families, sports or schools.

Identifying your transferable skills is one of the most important steps in the job-seeking process and often overlooked by those who feel they have no relevant experience.

For example a job may advertise for a receptionist who is;

“A friendly professional who can utilise organisational skills and bring a  high level of motivation.”

Your organisational skills and motivation may not come directly from a reception role but could be transferred from experience doing book work for your partner’s home business or from volunteering to coach and manage your child’s sports team.

Generally speaking the eight transferable or employability skills are thus;

  • Communication
  • Teamwork
  • Problem solving
  • Initiative and enterprise
  • Planning and organising
  • Self-management
  • Learning
  • Technology

When you identify how you utilise these skills in your daily life, it may surprise you how frequently or how expertly you do them. These skills may encompass your general capabilities, your qualities, your technical abilities and reflect your values and attitudes.

It’s true some employers may only be interested in your “relevant experience” but some may prefer a less experienced candidate who has great attitude and leadership skills than one who has all the right skills but is dull as dishwater and very robotic.

It is quite well known in the hiring and firing industry that managers may in fact prefer to  “ Hire for attitude not for skill”.  There is a general consensus that a number of job skills can be learned, but personality and motivation cannot. Aside from jobs that require purely technical expertise, your personal attributes and qualities may unearth a very viable candidate. 

Sometimes it can be difficult to identify and sell your transferable skills on your own, so asking for assistance can be a great idea. The career consultants at the Skills and Jobs Centre are experts at being able to listen and identify skills you may never have recognised, or had thought were irrelevant. They can also help you contextualise your soft skills and life experiences within a resume.

I strongly recommend a face to face consultation with a career counsellor, as this gives you the time to share your story and  experiences so your advisor can capitalise on all you may have to offer. Sometimes this can feel overwhelming or a little like putting yourself up on a “pedestal”. However, in this competitive job market you have to put your best foot forward and selling all of your skills and abilities is vital.

And remember,

 “Company knowledge and job-specific skills can be learned, but you can’t train a personality.”

Source: Richard Branson on hiring Virgin Staff.

Written by Erika, our Workshop Wizard. If you would like to talk to someone about your transferable skills, book a one-on-one appointment with Erika or any of our advisors.

Picture credit: London Permaculture

The Ford Transition Project

As part of the Ford Transition Project (FTP), Auto Skills Australia (ASA) has established an Outreach Centre to provide support for exited Ford & supply chain workers in Geelong at the newly opened Skills and Jobs Centre. The Centre will be staffed by an ASA representative.

The Outreach Centres will operate from November 7, 2016, through to April 30, 2017, and will provide exited workers an opportunity to speak to ASA and ensure that they are connected to relevant support services such as Outplacement Providers, jobactive providers, Skills & Job Centre, Training Organisations, Finance & Superannuation Services, Health & Wellbeing, Government Services and Community Networks.

Geelong ASA Outreach Centre:

  • Location: Skills and Jobs Centre, Level 1, Westfield Centre, Corner of Malop & Yarra St, Geelong, Store number 2254-2255 (Located near Big W)
  • Contact: Bob Hope, Mobile: 0419 271 835, Email: rhope@autoskillsaustralia.com.au
  • Times: Monday – Friday, 9.00am to 4.00pm

Your ASA outreach Centre will assist you in the following:

  • Connection to your selected outplacement provider
  • Government support services
  • Connection to training organisations
  • Health and well being programs
  • Superannuation funds and financial planning
  • Community networks and services
  • Continuation of case management
  • Advocacy support
  • Referrals
  • ASA gap funding up to 31 March 2017
  • Advice and support
  • Other services as required

Please see your ASA case manager for more details.

Written by Bob Hope, Ford Transition Program Area Coordinator – Geelong. Bob will be sharing his insights as a guest blogger during his time at The Gordon Skills and Jobs Centre. 

 

Job hunting got you down??

Unfortunately, for the majority of people rejection and unsuccessful applications are part and parcel of the job hunt. If you add some life stress on top of that it is easy to become disheartened and negative, but staying positive is a very important key to your job hunt success.

Here a few tips on how to keep positive.

  1. Preparation

One step to feeling positive is having confidence in your preparation, in particular your resume and cover letter. Your resume and cover letter are the first contact point for most job applications.

Make sure you to take the time to provide correct information and give details of the duties involved in your work history, any training and your personal attributes.

  1. Never dwell on rejection

It is important that if you’re unsuccessful you move on as quickly as possible and do your best not to take it personally because EVERYONE goes through the same rejection at some point in their job hunting experience. This can be hard for some but try to see every application or interview as a learning experience that will make you more confident for the next one. It also doesn’t hurt to ask for constructive feedback as to why you were not successful i.e. how you can improve your chances with future applications. Take that input and focus your efforts into other opportunities.

  1. Be your own biggest fan!!

Lastly and most importantly, value your own abilities and skills and be confident in knowing what you can bring to any organisation. This can be your training, your experience or even your personal attributes.

Don’t be afraid to use your life experience or achievements as transferable skills in the workplace. You may not have the training, but you may have natural ability dealing with people, time management skills as a parent or mechanical aptitude by fixing cars for your friends.

Ask friends and current or ex work colleagues what they think your strengths are too and this can give you extra insight and an added confidence boost.

Believe in yourself…Sounds corny I know, but it works!

Shai has a wide range of industry experience to help you in your job search, our King of Industry.

Written by Shai, our King of Industry. For help with finding a job, book an appointment with Shai or any of our helpful advisors. 

MAKING A FRESH START…… Job Applications for Newcomers to Australia

As a skilled immigrant, migrant, refugee or asylum seeker, there are a number of mountains to climb in your new country including mastering the language, adapting to cultural differences and learning how to work and play like the “Aussies” do. So, it is no surprise that negotiating the Australian workplace and its job application processes can also be an uphill battle.

So, to put your best foot forward in relation to job applications, I have provided a few HANDY HINTS below.

BUT FIRST, to avoid disappointment, I would ask that you consider the chart below, and ensure you meet these criteria. You are applying for jobs in a competitive environment with legal and contractual laws.

erikas-blog-graphic

1.Stick with the same name

Sometimes when settling in a new country, you may choose to modify your name according to make it easier to pronounce for a native English speaker.

This is a personal preference but just remember that if you choose that name, it needs to be consistent across all your paperwork when applying for a position. Your email address, resume, application and interaction with all employers and services will create a relationship with you based on that name.

2. Ensure an Australian organisation has validated your qualifications.

Although you may have completed a diploma, degree or postgraduate qualification in your country it may not have the same status in Australia.

It’s important to check with the relevant organisation, university, TAFE or industry body that your skills and qualifications are looked upon with the same status.

3. Religious and spiritual beliefs

In Australia, it is an offence to discriminate against any person based on religious grounds, nor to enquire about your religious beliefs in an interview.

In a very ethnically diverse country like Australia, we respect the right of all people to practice their own religious and cultural beliefs. Consequently, we do not put our religion, God or spiritual entities on our resumes or discuss in any way at an interview.

4. Marital status

Every woman and man has equal right within the home, workplace and community in Australia, whether you are married, single, or have children. Again it is against the law to ask questions about your marital status, or not hire you because you have children or are a female. That is private information.

If you feel you need to disclose information regarding your family or children to the employer that is your choice, but do not include that information on a resume.

5. Age

Again, it is an offence in Australia to discriminate by age.

There will always be those who will judge by age, and is doesn’t matter where you come from, and what your skills are, preferences are sometimes given to a younger person or someone they wish to train. DO NOT put your age on your resume; it can influence how an employer may view you as a candidate for the position.

6. References

If most of your references come from your country of origin they must be able to be contactable, by email, phone or Skype and be able to speak conversational English. A written reference is no longer an acceptable way to validate your employment history. If you have any local or Australian people you know who can act as a reference for you, in any capacity, that is most favourable. Volunteering for an organisation can also become very useful in providing you with a referee.

7. Written and Spoken English

If you are not confident writing in the English language please, please get assistance. If you are seeking a position relevant to your industry and qualifications then maybe speak to a professional resume writer, Australian industry body or Australian colleague familiar with that industry.

Despite some immigrants having exceptional qualifications and/or conversational English, errors can be made in a resume or interview that can really jeopardise your prospects. Simple spelling or grammar mistakes may betray your talents and skills.

Get to know some locals, as well as other new immigrants who have lived here many years. They can guide you and educate you on how Australians generally live and work and can be a great helping hand. Make sure you socialise, play sport, volunteer and attend community clubs, anything to give you more exposure to the Australian way of life.

Most importantly “WELCOME”, you are taking a very important step toward your new life in Australia.

Written by Erika, our Workshop Wizard. If you are new to Australia and would like some help with understanding the local job market, please make an appointment with any of our advisors.

How to get a public service job.

The Skills and Jobs Centre recently held a government employer panel as part of our Festival of Change, featuring representatives from National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA), WorkSafe and Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). In addition to providing an overview of their organisations, the panel offered some excellent tips and tricks for those wanting to work within the sector.

Employer Snapshot: NDIA

  • Currently 7 sites and expected to grow to 95. Geelong will remain the central office.
  • Currently has 1600 employees and is expected to grow to 3000. 80% of the positions will be in service delivery.
  • For potential employees they focus on the person: their passion, their focus on making a difference and those who are flexible and game to stretch their skills out of their own comfort zone.
  • For the future there will be many planner roles needed. Those who can help individuals with plans for moving forward.

The key skills they look for are:

  • Contemporary attitudes to disability
  • A collaborative approach
  • Service orientation
  • Communication skills
  • System orientation
  • Participants at the forefront
  • Empathy
  • Ability to build relationships
  • Leadership qualities, if necessary

Process for applying:

  • Very useful website regarding the application process under jobs.  Values of the organisation are clearly laid out and are very important to the organisation.
  • Also in the vacancies area there is an Expected Vacancies Register for people to express an interest in working with NDIA.
  • As part of that registration process you will need to complete a Statement of Claim: 1500 words that addresses the Selection Criteria for the position. Spend time preparing this before you register.
  • For information about the application process contact the Contact Officer for the position.

Employer Snapshot: WorkSafe

  • Relocating to Geelong by 2018.
  • 1000 employees.
  • Recruitment is through the Talent Acquisition Team.
  • The focus of WorkSafe is on Education, OH&S enforcement, helping injured people return to work, insurance for employers and managing workers compensation scheme. So the roles are varied.

Employees need to show:

  • A passion for safety, be vibrant and dynamic
  • Technical skills, if required
  • Soft skills such as teamwork, flexibility and initiative
  • Values such as integrity and support
  • Leadership skills may be required
  • They are seeking Career Development
  • The right attitude

To apply:

  • The process for applying involves uploading resume online, phone interview to show your motivation, skills and background, then a behavioural interview.
  • See their website under careers.

Employer Snapshot: ABS

  • Has 2000 employees with 300 jobs being in Geelong.
  • Roles in Geelong are technology based.
  • The workforce is dynamic, professional, able to understand and exhibit confidentiality and responsibility.

Key skills required:

  • The sorts of skills or qualities they seek include integrity, confidentiality, motivation, teamwork and people skills. Work is repetitive, flexible, in a high security area and requires knowledge of MS Office and Lotus Notes.

To apply:

  • The website includes information about the application process including an understanding of the APS Code of Conduct and their values.
  • The application process is an online one and further tips are given with the vacancy.
  • It is important to match your skills to the skills required in the position.
  • Do your background research of the ABS on their website.
  • Read the selection criteria very carefully.
  • Give real examples and think about your experiences.
  • Ongoing positions advertised on the website.
  • There is a non-ongoing register.