Job hunting got you down??

Unfortunately, for the majority of people rejection and unsuccessful applications are part and parcel of the job hunt. If you add some life stress on top of that it is easy to become disheartened and negative, but staying positive is a very important key to your job hunt success.

Here a few tips on how to keep positive.

  1. Preparation

One step to feeling positive is having confidence in your preparation, in particular your resume and cover letter. Your resume and cover letter are the first contact point for most job applications.

Make sure you to take the time to provide correct information and give details of the duties involved in your work history, any training and your personal attributes.

  1. Never dwell on rejection

It is important that if you’re unsuccessful you move on as quickly as possible and do your best not to take it personally because EVERYONE goes through the same rejection at some point in their job hunting experience. This can be hard for some but try to see every application or interview as a learning experience that will make you more confident for the next one. It also doesn’t hurt to ask for constructive feedback as to why you were not successful i.e. how you can improve your chances with future applications. Take that input and focus your efforts into other opportunities.

  1. Be your own biggest fan!!

Lastly and most importantly, value your own abilities and skills and be confident in knowing what you can bring to any organisation. This can be your training, your experience or even your personal attributes.

Don’t be afraid to use your life experience or achievements as transferable skills in the workplace. You may not have the training, but you may have natural ability dealing with people, time management skills as a parent or mechanical aptitude by fixing cars for your friends.

Ask friends and current or ex work colleagues what they think your strengths are too and this can give you extra insight and an added confidence boost.

Believe in yourself…Sounds corny I know, but it works!

Shai has a wide range of industry experience to help you in your job search, our King of Industry.

Written by Shai, our King of Industry. For help with finding a job, book an appointment with Shai or any of our helpful advisors. 

MAKING A FRESH START…… Job Applications for Newcomers to Australia

As a skilled immigrant, migrant, refugee or asylum seeker, there are a number of mountains to climb in your new country including mastering the language, adapting to cultural differences and learning how to work and play like the “Aussies” do. So, it is no surprise that negotiating the Australian workplace and its job application processes can also be an uphill battle.

So, to put your best foot forward in relation to job applications, I have provided a few HANDY HINTS below.

BUT FIRST, to avoid disappointment, I would ask that you consider the chart below, and ensure you meet these criteria. You are applying for jobs in a competitive environment with legal and contractual laws.

erikas-blog-graphic

1.Stick with the same name

Sometimes when settling in a new country, you may choose to modify your name according to make it easier to pronounce for a native English speaker.

This is a personal preference but just remember that if you choose that name, it needs to be consistent across all your paperwork when applying for a position. Your email address, resume, application and interaction with all employers and services will create a relationship with you based on that name.

2. Ensure an Australian organisation has validated your qualifications.

Although you may have completed a diploma, degree or postgraduate qualification in your country it may not have the same status in Australia.

It’s important to check with the relevant organisation, university, TAFE or industry body that your skills and qualifications are looked upon with the same status.

3. Religious and spiritual beliefs

In Australia, it is an offence to discriminate against any person based on religious grounds, nor to enquire about your religious beliefs in an interview.

In a very ethnically diverse country like Australia, we respect the right of all people to practice their own religious and cultural beliefs. Consequently, we do not put our religion, God or spiritual entities on our resumes or discuss in any way at an interview.

4. Marital status

Every woman and man has equal right within the home, workplace and community in Australia, whether you are married, single, or have children. Again it is against the law to ask questions about your marital status, or not hire you because you have children or are a female. That is private information.

If you feel you need to disclose information regarding your family or children to the employer that is your choice, but do not include that information on a resume.

5. Age

Again, it is an offence in Australia to discriminate by age.

There will always be those who will judge by age, and is doesn’t matter where you come from, and what your skills are, preferences are sometimes given to a younger person or someone they wish to train. DO NOT put your age on your resume; it can influence how an employer may view you as a candidate for the position.

6. References

If most of your references come from your country of origin they must be able to be contactable, by email, phone or Skype and be able to speak conversational English. A written reference is no longer an acceptable way to validate your employment history. If you have any local or Australian people you know who can act as a reference for you, in any capacity, that is most favourable. Volunteering for an organisation can also become very useful in providing you with a referee.

7. Written and Spoken English

If you are not confident writing in the English language please, please get assistance. If you are seeking a position relevant to your industry and qualifications then maybe speak to a professional resume writer, Australian industry body or Australian colleague familiar with that industry.

Despite some immigrants having exceptional qualifications and/or conversational English, errors can be made in a resume or interview that can really jeopardise your prospects. Simple spelling or grammar mistakes may betray your talents and skills.

Get to know some locals, as well as other new immigrants who have lived here many years. They can guide you and educate you on how Australians generally live and work and can be a great helping hand. Make sure you socialise, play sport, volunteer and attend community clubs, anything to give you more exposure to the Australian way of life.

Most importantly “WELCOME”, you are taking a very important step toward your new life in Australia.

Written by Erika, our Workshop Wizard. If you are new to Australia and would like some help with understanding the local job market, please make an appointment with any of our advisors.

Top tips from employers on getting a job in Health & Community Services in Geelong

The Skills and Jobs Centre recently held an employer panel as part of our Festival of Change, featuring representatives from Barwon Health, Karingal and the City of Greater Geelong. In addition to providing an overview of their organisations, the panel offered some excellent tips and tricks for those wanting to work within the sector.

With Geelong becoming a Health and Education hub, working in the Health sector offers secure, long-term work. There are a variety of roles available in addition to specialist medical positions, however these roles don’t tend to be highly paid. People who work in the sector do so because they want to work with and support others, not because they want to earn the big bucks. If this sounds like you, then one of these organisations may be the employer for you:

Employer Snapshot: Barwon Health

  • Employs over 7,000 staff across 22 sites located from Geelong all the way down to Warrnambool;
  • Upcoming additions include a new hospital which is being built in the north of Geelong;
  • In the near future there will be a focus on the areas of Telehealth (a collection of means or methods for enhancing health care, public health, and health education delivery and support using telecommunications technologies) and Health Promotion;
  • Positions, including the administrative casual pool, are advertised on their website and Seek.

Christine from Talent Acquisition made the following suggestions for those wanting to work at Barwon Health:

  • Connect with Barwon Health on social media to remain up-to-date on what is happening within the organisation. Mentioning an upcoming project and highlighting how you could contribute during the recruitment process shows initiative and a real interest in the work they do;
  • View videos on their YouTube channel to find out more about the different teams and roles;
  • Volunteer – not only will it provide you with invaluable experience and connections within the organisation, it also allows you to apply for internal vacancies. Available volunteer positions can be found on their website;
  • When applying, make your resume as clear and easy to read as possible, with your skills easily identifiable;
  • Include a summary/profile section at the top of your resume which provides a snapshot of your experience;
  • Incorporate Barwon Health’s values into your cover letter;
  • If you are successful in gaining an interview, make sure you know both the values and their definitions.

Employer Snapshot: Karingal

  • Employs over 17,000 staff across Victoria, South Australia and Queensland;
  • Provides aged care, disability and mental health support services;
  • Additional arms are Karingal Training and Kommercial (catering services);
  • Will shortly be merging with St Laurence, with specific dates etc. still to be determined;

Ashlan had the following advice for those wanting to work at Karingal:

  • There is no minimum qualification requirements for their individual support workers. Instead they will be trained through Karingal Training once hired;
  • People wanting to get a taste of the sector before committing to training/a full role should consider volunteering. Karingal currently have 100’s of volunteers in the aged care and disability areas;
  • Their positions are advertised on their website and on Seek;
  • They have 4 rounds of recruitment each year, which last roughly 6-8 weeks;
  • Karingal look for staff that want to be part of the team and share in their vision, mission and guiding principles.

Employer Snapshot: City of Greater Geelong

  • Employs 300 care workers, mostly in home support, working as a mobile care force;
  • Their philosophy is doing things with people rather than for people. The goal is to help people remain independent;
  • Aged Care is one of the most secure areas to work in locally;
  • Similar reforms will occur in aged care over the next 5-10 years as has been seen with NDIS.

Geoff from Aged and Disability Services had the following advice for those wanting to work at the City of Greater Geelong:

  • All recruitment is done through Direct Recruitment, including administrative support staff;
  • They tend to employ 3-4 new workers each month;
  • The minimum qualification level is Certificate III in a relevant area such as Aged Care or Individual Support;
  • In addition to the qualification, practical experience is highly sought after – having relevant volunteer experience will benefit your application;
  • The most successful Care Workers are able to help people but keep some professional distance and do not allow themselves to become too affected.

A final few tips:

  • The sector is a small community within Geelong – network as much as possible!
  • Create a LinkedIn profile and actively engage with the organisation/s you are interested in working for;
  • Research the organisations you are interested in, particularly their values and missions;
  • Ensure you have reasonable IT skills;
  • Keep up-to-date regarding changes to the sector and reflect this knowledge during the recruitment process.

Top 5 Resume Tips!

In today’s competitive job market finding a way to stand out among the scores of other candidates is getting harder, especially when some employers will spend as little as 6 seconds reviewing your application.

So how exactly do you make your resume so amazing that an employer simply can’t help but notice it? No, the answer does not involve glitter and pictures of unicorns – it’s much easier than that!

1. Tailor your resume

When reviewing resumes employers want to know one thing and one thing only – does this applicant have the skills and abilities to be successful in this role? They don’t care about where you went to high school 10 years ago, the incomplete qualification you started in a completely different field or your marital/health status.

Your job is to make sure that your resume contains only information that is relevant to the role you are applying for and is presented in a way that is clear and easy for the employer to read. The best place to start is by carefully reviewing the job ad and/or position description (if applicable). This will help you gain an understanding of exactly what the employer is looking for and which of your key skills/experiences you need to draw attention to.

2. Keep it short and sweet

The ideal length for a resume in Australia is 2 pages. If you are having trouble sticking to this length, one easy way to save space, particularly if you have a comprehensive work history, is to only go in to detail of what the role involved for positions you have held for the past 15-20 years. For roles held prior to that time frame you can simply list the position titles and employers (no dates required) under the heading “Positions held prior to (relevant year)”.

You want to ensure that the layout of your resume helps the employer find whatever information they are looking for as quickly and easily as possible. To do this, make sure there is lots of white space, that your sections (e.g. Summary, Employment History) are clearly defined and that you use dot points throughout.

3. Mirror the language used in the job ad/position description

Not only will this help get your application past any Applicant Tracking System (ATS) the employer may be using, it is also an easy way to draw their attention to your suitability for the role. For example, if the job ad asks for someone with the “Ability to maintain up to date documentation” then highlight when previous roles have involved this (e.g. you may have as a responsibility “Created and maintained up to date documentation outlining the department’s Customer Service policy.”)

If the requirements of the role involve specific technical experience or software, and you have that experience, make sure you use the exact same wording in your resume as is in the job ad. There is always a risk that the person reviewing your application does not have any experience in that role and has simply been given a checklist of skills/experience to shortlist against. If, for example, you were applying for a role that involved welding, the person shortlisting may not have the technical background to understand that your experience with MMAW (manual metal arc welding) is the same as having experience with SMAW (shielded metal arc welding).

4. Always include a cover letter

I really can’t stress enough how important it is for you to include a cover letter with your resume – even if the job ad does not ask for one. Not only is this your chance to inject some personality in to your application and create a point of difference between yourself and other applicants, including a cover letter automatically makes your application stronger than those that have only submitted a resume. The cover letter offers a great opportunity to build on the information in your resume and clearly state what you have to offer that specific employer and why you want to work for them. It also offers a chance to highlight any values or community involvement you share with the employer.

5. Quantify your achievements

Which sounds more impressive – I increased traffic to our social media accounts by 68% over a 6 month period OR I increased traffic to our social media accounts? Hopefully your answer was example number 1! By providing actual figures around your achievements you paint a much more complete picture of your capabilities for the employer. You also save them wondering “well, how much did they increase traffic by? How long did this take?” Again, this is about giving the employer the information they need in the quickest and easiest way.

By creating a streamlined, easy to read resume you are making the employer’s job that much easier and increasing your chances of being invited for an interview. And that, after all, is the whole purpose of your resume – to get the opportunity to stand in front of the employer and convince them you are the best person for the role.

Written by our resume queen, Christina. If you need help with your resume, make an appointment to see Christina or any of our helpful advisors.

The Tinder of Job Applications!

Are you sick of trawling through Seek and other online job boards? Then, you have to check this out!

For those of you who are single, or have a friend who is (let’s be honest, we’ve all seen a Tinder account), it looks and feels exactly the same as Tinder.

It’s called Found!

And I think I’m in love! (No, I haven’t confused it for Tinder!) Seriously, wait until you see this app.. I don’t think I’ve ever had so much fun searching for a job!

Being a fairly new app, I didn’t expect to find much in our region, but I was pleasantly surprised to see lots of Geelong jobs coming up. Most of the jobs are in hospitality and retail, but there are also opportunities in sales and admin.

Firstly, you update your profile to include long walks on the beach and holding hands.. oops, I mean, you include your employment history, education and even your referees.

Then, you start to search for jobs. Each job comes up with a profile of the employer, location and description of the job.

You then have the opportunity to hit yes or no (the same as swiping left or right on Tinder). By hitting yes, your details are provided to the employer who can then make contact with you to discuss the opportunity.

One of the best parts is that you don’t have to upload anything!!

This would have to be the simplest way of searching for a job I have seen yet. I’m hoping for more of a move in this direction.

Check it out for yourself (www.found.careers) and let us know how you go 🙂

Written by our social media guru, Tracey. If you need assistance with your job search, make an appointment with Tracey or any of our helpful advisors.

Why this robot might be reading your resume!

The fact that applying for a job is an incredibly stressful experience is something I think we can all agree on. No matter which industry you work in, whether you have been applying for jobs for years or it’s your first time, no one gets much enjoyment from having to spend hours creating a standout resume and cover letter. Which is why it’s so depressing to realise that even with the perfect resume you may not get past the first stage. Why? Let me introduce you to that invisible member of the recruitment panel, the Applicant Tracking System (ATS).

Before I go into too much detail, a disclaimer – not all job applications will go through an ATS. However, with a rise in on-line applications and a drop in the cost of such software, the use of an ATS by employers is becoming more and more common. With this in mind it is probably best to assume your application will be put through an ATS and to prepare your documents accordingly.

What is an ATS and how does it work?

In simple terms an ATS is a software system that is used by employers to process job applications and to manage the hiring process. It’s basically a robot that scans applications for key words and phrases identified by the employer, and then ranks those applications based on a combination of the amount of times those key words/phrases appear and the length of the applicant’s relevant experience. Only those applications that rank highest will be passed on for review by a staff member.

Flaws of an ATS and how these can affect your application

Like anything computerised, an ATS looks for exact matches and doesn’t have the human ability to identify “like for like”. For example, an employer might have identified “collaboration” as a key word but if you have used the term “team work” instead, the system will not recognise that as a match. Now, we both know that collaboration and team work are pretty much the same thing but unfortunately the ATS does not. Thus, the system can miss suitable candidates who have simply used different terminology to that which the ATS has been told to look for.

Additionally, the first thing an ATS will do prior to scanning your resume is to remove all formatting. This can cause issues if, for example, you have used a table. Rather than reading the information contained within that table from left to right, an ATS reads it vertically. This can cause the context of the information to be misinterpreted (e.g. rather than reading your qualification as “Bachelor of Engineering” the ATS might read it as “Deakin University”) or worse, lost completely.

How to make sure your application gets through to be seen by a human

As we have seen, an ATS does not read documents in the same way you and I do and thus can miss information if it is not presented in a specific way.

To ensure your documents match their formatting requirements make sure you stick to the following:

  • Save your documents using Microsoft Word – avoid PDF, RTF and JPG documents as ATS’ have difficulty reading these correctly
  • Use fonts such as Arial, Georgia, Courier or Tahoma, and always use black text. Avoid underlining lowercase words as this can impact on the legibility of some letters (such as j, y and g)
  • Don’t include headers, footers, tables, graphics, borders, symbols or shading as these will confuse the algorithms used by ATS’s to extract information
  • Stick with straightforward section titles such as Summary, Skills, Work Experience, Education and References which are easy for ATS’s to recognise
  • Include key words/phrases and qualifications which are relevant to the role. Make sure you use them in the exact same way they appear in the job ad and/or position description (if applicable) – e.g. if the wording in the job ad is “experienced in Occupational Health and Safety”, don’t write “have experience in OH&S”
  • Triple check your spelling and have a trusted friend or family member also check. If key words are incorrectly spelt then the ATS won’t be able to pick them up
  • ATS’s always look for your previous employer’s details first so when listing your work experience start with the employer’s name, then your position title and then the dates you worked in that role:
    • Barwon Health
    • Porter
    • 2012-2015

Following the above tips will help ensure your resume stands the best chance of making it through to be seen by an actual human. However, don’t forget that you do actually need to meet the requirements of the position. Peppering your application with key words might get you past the ATS but they need to be backed up by evidence of experience if you want that interview.

Written by our resident resume queen, Christina Matthews. Book an appointment with Christina for help with your job application or sign up for Christina’s resume workshop.

How choosing the wrong referee can cost you that dream job

You’ve spent hours poring over the job ad and company website, tailoring your resume to perfectly match the skills and experience required. You’ve even drafted a killer cover letter that perfectly highlights what a great match you are, not just for the role but for the organisation as well.

So, time to submit? Not quite. There is one more aspect of your application to consider. Your referees. Whether you want to list them on your resume or hold off on providing them until asked at an interview, you need to pay as much attention to selecting your referees as you do to the rest of your application. Why? Because who you choose to use as a referee can make the difference between scoring the job of your dreams and having to go back to the job search drawing board.

It’s not a numbers game

When choosing referees always go with quality over quantity. Generally speaking having two referees should be enough to satisfy most company’s internal recruitment policies, however it doesn’t hurt to have a third just in case one of your referees is out of contact. Four referees is overkill, unless specifically requested by the employer.

Always provide at least one contact number rather than an e-mail address, unless your referee is overseas and then you should provide both. Generally speaking, prospective employers will want to have a verbal conversation with a referee so they can get all the information they need in one go rather than e-mailing back and forth.

Professional over personal

While your referees do not necessarily have to be previous employers (there are several reasons why this may not be possible), they do need to be able to speak about you in a professional setting. Select referees that can provide employers with the type of information they want. They are not interested in personal references so friends, neighbours and family members are out. Have at least one referee who has managed you, in paid employment or a volunteer capacity.

If you do not have a significant work history, have owned your own business or have lost contact with previous employers the following referee alternatives could be suitable:

  • Teacher from the qualification you have just completed (particularly useful if you are applying for roles in a new field)
  • Bank manager/contractor/long-term customer if you are a small business owner
  • President of your local sporting club where you are the Secretary
  • Supervisor from a community services organisation where you volunteer
  • Friend/family member/business owner that you have done work for

Choose wisely

Before starting at the Skills and Jobs Centre I worked in student administration at a university. When I decided to follow my dream and start applying for career counselling roles I had a choice to make. One academic I had worked closely with offered to act as a referee. They had a PhD so I knew any prospective employer would be impressed by their title, however in the end I didn’t take them up on their offer. Why? Because despite knowing they would have only positive things to say about me, personal experience told me they had a terrible phone manner. They would give one word responses and come across as seriously lacking in interest.

Far better as a referee was the junior lecturer I worked with on a project who, whilst having a far less impressive job title, was talkative, engaging and able to articulate the positive traits and skills they had seen in me. The moral of the story? A more senior position title does not necessarily make for a better referee. Pick people with whom you have worked closely and who have the verbal communication skills to clearly and enthusiastically express their recommendation of you.

Getting permission

Once you have decided on who you would like to act as your referees the next step is to ask their permission. As great as you rightly think you are not everyone will have the same opinion, so never assume that just because you worked with someone they will be falling over themselves to provide a reference for you.

Word them up

If you are lucky enough to be invited to an interview you should let your referees know as soon as possible. It’s a good idea to also send them through a copy of the job ad or position description so they can get an understanding of what the role entails and prepare some responses. If you have a close relationship with them, and feel comfortable doing so, it is perfectly fine for you ask them to highlight certain skills/previous experience that is relevant to the role you are interviewing for.

A thank you costs nothing

Regardless of whether or not you are successful in getting the role, if your referees have been contacted and provided a reference for you, you should take the time to thank them. Depending on your relationship with them this may be anything from a nice e-mail or card, to a bunch of flowers or shouting them a coffee. Not only have they taken time out of their own busy schedules to help you but you never know when you might need them to be your referee again.

Written by our resident resume queen, Christina Matthews. Sign up for Christina’s resume workshop for some more great tips on job applications.

Don’t take it personally!

During the years that I have worked with jobseekers, the number 1 grievance is “I never hear back from anyone about my job application”. It is the common experience for most people. Being left in limbo is the norm.

Gone are the days when you would receive the standard “thanks but no thanks” letter in the mail. These days, the best you can expect is an automatically computer generated email advising that your application has been received and if you haven’t heard anything within 2 weeks then consider your application unsuccessful. You may also see the occasional ad in the employment section of the newspaper thanking applicants and advising that the position has now been filled. The personal approach is long gone. But why? Let’s look at some stats.

When we look at the business data for the Geelong Region you can see that there are 16,489 businesses registered (June 2015 – Australian Bureau of Statistics). So when we cancel out the businesses that are non-employing (9,857 (59.77%) – usually sole traders/home businesses) that leaves us with 6,632 businesses. Of these remaining businesses, 4,600 (27.89%) employ 1-4 people, 1,627 (9.86%) employ 5-19 people, 384 (2.32%) employ 20-199 people and 21 (0.12%) employ 200+ people. So what does this all mean?

Of the 6,632 businesses in the Geelong Region that may have possible job opportunities, over 93% of them are small businesses employing less than 20 people.

Small businesses usually do not have a dedicated HR department to handle their job applications which leaves the entire hiring process in the hands of managers and owners who are typically very busy people. Time is money and money is tight and the cold hard facts are that they do not have the time or the money to respond individually to each applicant. It’s not personal…it’s business… Small business!

 So, please don’t be disheartened. You’re not alone in limbo.

Source:
Enterprise Geelong
http://www.economicprofile.com.au/geelong/trends/business-counts/staff

Written by our local expert, Jodie. For more information about job applications or business  in Geelong, speak to Jodie or any of our Skills and Jobs Centre advisors.

 

 

 

Key Selection Criteria – what on earth is it and why should I care about it?

christinas blog no1

In the exhausting, stressful and sometimes downright depressing process that is applying for jobs, one of the most groan-inducing aspects would surely have to be responding to key selection criteria (sometimes referred to as KSC).

I’ve yet to come across someone who jumps up and down with glee at the prospect of spending hours of their precious time crafting responses to these seemingly never ending criteria and, quite frankly, I would worry about them if they did!

Whilst there has been some talk of a recent shift away from key selection criteria, a large number of positions, particularly in the education, government and healthcare sectors, do still require applicants to submit responses along with their cover letter and resume.

So how do you put together coherent, concise responses that give employers the exact information they are looking for without pulling your hair out? Relax, we’ve got you covered – prepare to embrace the STAR model! 

What is KSC?

Given not everyone will have previously come across key selection criteria let’s rewind for a second and talk about what it actually is – and why it’s important.

Key selection criteria identifies the personal qualities, skills, abilities, knowledge and/or qualifications that a person needs in order to perform a role effectively. These criteria will be listed on the position description (PD) that goes along with the role.

The number of key selection criteria a role will have can vary anywhere from 3 to 12 (yes, I have actually seen a PD with 12 key selection criteria on it). The good news is that not all roles have a PD and, for those roles that don’t, key selection criteria responses aren’t needed. Huzzah!

For those roles that do have a PD, and related key selection criteria, applicants will be assessed against these criteria during the shortlisting process. To show employers that you are the right person for this job it is not enough to simply state that you meet the criteria, you need to provide specific examples that prove your suitability for the job.

Do I really have to respond to KSC?

Employers include key selection criteria for a reason. They want as much information as possible on which to base their decision. Whilst creating an additional document responding to this criteria on top of your cover letter and resume may seem like a hassle, simply ignoring it will get you a one-way ticket to “thanks but no thanks” town.

What exactly is the STAR Model?

Similar to the CAR (Context, Action, Result) model, the STAR model provides a straightforward blueprint for how to structure your key selection criteria responses:

STAR model

You need to respond to each individual criteria with the length of your responses varying depending on the example you are using and how many components that specific criteria contains.

For example, “Experience in providing exceptional customer service” would require a 1-2 paragraph response as it contains only one component – experience in customer service.

Experience in managing office processes in a high-pressure environment and providing administrative and coordination support to senior members of an organisation” on the other hand would require a response of anywhere between 2-4 paragraphs.

This is due to the need to address experience in managing office processes (1), working in a high-pressure environment (2), providing administrative and coordination support (3) and supporting senior staff (4).

The key is to make sure you are not rambling – read the response back to make sure you have only included relevant information. Better yet, get a friend or family member to read it. They’ll soon tell you if your response has gone from winning to snooze-worthy!

Finished Product

Sometimes all the explanations and models in the world can’t beat seeing a theory in action. So just for you I’ve put together an example key selection criteria and response, highlighting the different components. Enjoy!

Example selection criterai.jpg

Written by our resident resume queen, Christina Matthews. Subscribe to our blog to receive regular resume tips & tricks from Christina. Or consider coming along to one of her fantastic workshops.